italian towns, asteroids, and caring

Reading

Civita di Bagnoregio

Who Will Save These Dying Italian Towns about small rural towns across Italy threatened by depopulation, poverty, and sometimes by being on top of a massive hill. The answer to the question (‘who will save them?’) is probably tourism, as it turns out, because they’re frequently stunning.

I do prefer the approach taken with Sutera though, which “in 2013, at the behest of its mayor, the town opened its doors — and its empty houses — to survivors of the catastrophic Lampedusa shipwreck”. Love this:

Sutera’s population had dwindled from 5,000 in 1970 to just 1,500, and the mayor recognized the humanitarian and economic opportunity the migrants could provide for his moribund town. To help the refugees, most of whom are from sub-Saharan Africa, integrate into the community, they are paired with local families, and required to take Italian lessons, given to them by the town’s citizens. (The European Union provides funding for food, clothing and housing, which can spur the creation of jobs for both migrants and locals.) Initially, there was some resistance, but that has disappeared with the energy these newcomers have brought to the area. Today, one can find young Nigerians taking their morning espresso alongside the old men, and local children kicking soccer balls in the street with their new playmates. And each summer the town hosts a daylong festival featuring the traditional food, music and dance of the immigrants.

This post on ‘House Address “Twins” Proximity‘ by Paul Plowman (and the comments) about his quest to find houses with matching addresses nearby. It sounds a little dry now that I’ve tried to explain it in a sentence, but it’s a fun read.

Making

A little thing to visualise data from the NASA Near Earth Object Web Service API. I call it: ‘asteroid locator‘. You pass in a particular date, and it’ll show you all the objects [that NASA count as ‘near Earth’ and have logged] in space on that day.

Watching

The Fundamentals of Caring. Very much enjoyed it. All the feels.

emoji’s and an egyptian library

Listening to Notes on an Imagined Plaque and Person in Lotus Position, both on 99pi. The first one is a short but powerful imagining to do with a statue of horribly racist General Nathan Bedford Forrest, and in light of the recent furore around removing confederate monuments, is required listening. It’s so well done. On a lighter… Read more »

stuff related to gender, also sex

Watching Robert Webb talk about his new book How Not To Be A Boy – the full interview he did with C4 is here, but even this short clip brings the realness. .@arobertwebb wants us to stop telling boys to "man up". His new autobiography tackles the reality of what's expected of boys and men. pic.twitter.com/g75Y8nzjrZ… Read more »

get offline, stay offline, don’t eat meat

Reading This article on Wired How to Stay in the Moment: Take a Picture – sort of justifying the constant point and shoot nature of the world today. I’m still torn between the guilt of living life through a screen and the knowledge that I will (and do) forget things very easily if I don’t have a photo… Read more »

emotions, skateboarding, and speech recognition

(An attempt to log recent activities, on the web. Some sort of internet diary if you will). This week I have mostly been.. Listening Invisibilia, ‘Emotions‘, part 1 and 2, which I will attempt to summarise here for the benefit of my own poor memory. So we’re taught that we’re wired to feel responses to stimulus (e.g…. Read more »

inspiring post about to-do lists

My personal to-do list is over 30 pages long. 30 pages of a carefully maintained moleskine consisting of A5 ruled paper, adorned with black ink oozed from a Pilot® Razor Point Pen. I inspect it carefully each morning, looking for quick-wins that I’ll be able to draw a line through, before inevitably turning to the final… Read more »

Barcamp Bournemouth 6

I went to this event, gave some talks, had some fun, learnt some stuff.

Code Club Week 5

Finishing fireworks and dishing out certificates.